Day THIRTY: Japan Hawk Migration

Hello friends,

On Wednesday the fourth I went to Plum Park in the city of Ome. This is a place where you can see many birds that are migrating. To get to Ome we first had to wake up early and get on the train.

After going past Tokyo we finally got to Ome, and found ourselves in a beautiful little town surrounded by trees.

We began searching for the birding group that was supposed to be watching hawks. That week was the week that hundreds of hawks were supposed to began migrating. We eventually saw the birding group on top of a green hill with a gentle path going up to them.

I could tell they were birders because they had birding scopes. I was confident that they were watching hawks, because they were on a hill that had a good view of the surrounding sky. When we got to the top of the hill we were welcomed by a bunch of Japanese birders and we signed in. There was one birder that could speak really good English. We asked many questions and she was happy to answer all of them. I soon found the group to be like any other birding group I had ever been to. A group of really nice people who were happy to answer questions and tell what they knew. Their techniques for birding were the same as every other group of birders I had ever met. Birding techniques are all the same around the world!

I saw many species of hawks and some species of other birds as well.

One of my favorite birds I saw was the Grey-Streaked Flycatcher because it is scarce in Japan. It only migrates through Japan, it doesn’t stay anywhere for long. Eventually we headed back with good memories and new friendships. I hope I will never forget the time that I met my first Japanese birding group.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey-streaked_flycatcher

 

Elias

One thought on “Day THIRTY: Japan Hawk Migration

  1. I was really looking forward to this blog post 🙂
    I’m so happy that you had a great day!

    Btw this Plum Park was in the news some years ago because there were some tree infections and they had to chop down all 1700 plum trees including an 800 yr old one!
    So, even though it’s called Plum Park in the area of Baigo (which means “plum village”) in the city of Ome (which means “green plums”), there were no plum trees when you were there…

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